Home > Featured Blog Posts & News

Gov. Nathan Deal, State Sen. Carter to Meet with Georgia Clergy in Faith Forum

October 2, 2014, 3:03 pm | Posted by

Candidates will discuss values and issues with diverse Georgia faith leaders

Atlanta, GA – Gov. Nathan Deal and State Senator Jason Carter have both agreed to meet with faith leaders from across Georgia as part of the Georgia Faith Forum, where the candidates will field issues-focused and values-focused questions from clergy members of the Georgia Faith Forum board.

The forum will be live-streamed by WSB-TV Channel 2 and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and aired live by WSB Radio and KISS 104.1FM on October 22 from Trinity Presbyterian Church in Atlanta. The event will consist of separate, hour-long discussions with Governor Deal and State Senator Carter. Moderators from WSB will facilitate, and the candidates will discuss issues of common concern to the faith community such as gun policy, criminal justice, human trafficking, immigration and the future of our children.

“Trinity Presbyterian is very pleased to host the Georgia Faith Form with Governor Deal and State Senator Carter,” said Rev. Pam Driesell, Senior Pastor of Trinity Presbyterian Church in Atlanta. “We look forward to a substantive dialogue that allows both candidates to talk in depth about their values, faith and policy priorities.”

“The faith community is vitally concerned about many current issues,” said Dr. R. Alan Culpepper, Dean of the McAfee School of Theology at Mercer University. “So we are grateful that the candidates are willing meet with us to discuss issues and possible avenues of collaboration.”

“Our congregations are hungry for a substantive dialogue that focuses on the common good instead of the usual political talking points,” said Rev. Billy Honor, Senior Pastor of New Life Presbyterian Church in College Park. “The Georgia Faith Forum will provide a conversation that reflects our values.”

“We are pleased to support the 45 diverse leaders of the Georgia Faith Forum board in holding this unique bipartisan forum,” said Rev. Jennifer Butler, CEO of Faith in Public Life, which is helping to coordinate the event. “I look forward to an event that addresses the issues and priorities that bring the faith community together.”

Further information about the Georgia Faith Forum board can be found here.

add a comment »

Prominent Faith Leaders Announce Nationwide Mobilization and Accountability Plans for Midterm Elections

September 9, 2014, 3:00 pm | Posted by

Diverse religious groups unveil plans to engage voters on common-good policies, rather than divisive culture war issues

Washington, DC – Today, leaders from prominent progressive faith organizations announced plans to mobilize voters and hold politicians accountable in this year’s midterm elections. Around the country, clergy and faith-based organizations will launch campaigns, ranging from massive voter registration drives to cross country bus tours.

Ten years ago, so-called “values voters” re-elected George W. Bush by playing to peoples’ fears and highlighting divisive social issues. Since then, progressive faith leaders have been forging new coalitions to disarm these ideological divides, and are using new strategies to amplify their voices and their agenda—an agenda that centers on addressing growing economic inequality, racial discrimination, immigrant rights, voting rights and healthcare.

“We believe that for too long, the so-called ‘Religious Right’ has established themselves as the point of view of people of faith in America,” said Gov. Ted Strickland, president of the Center for American Progress Action Fund and Methodist minister. “The community of faith is particularly positioned to bring to light what is right in wrong in the politics of our country.”

A recent study from the Brookings Institution found that religious progressives are gaining on religious conservatives and constitute a powerful political force. That force is moving justice for the marginalized and the poor back to the heart of the political debate.

“We need to reexamine our moral compass,” said Rev. Dr. William Barber, leader of the Moral Mondays Movement. “The extreme ideology we see is a sign that we need to reexamine our moral compass. We believe this is a resurgence of social concerns in the public square.”

Several speakers announced plans to specifically target drop-off voters in the Rising American Electorate.

“Over the next few months, we will be reaching out to 1 million persons of faith, engaging them people to people, neighbor to neighbor,” said Rev. Alvin Herring, deputy director with PICO National Network, the largest faith-based community-organizing group in the country. “We understand that moving people from disengaged to engaged requires a new understanding of the moral components of voting.”

“Immigration reform was remained stagnant in the House, there still has not been reform to mass incarceration, and it makes no sense that in the richest country in the world, people can’t make a living wage,” said Rev. Gabe Salguero, president of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition. “We raise these concerns not just as political issues, but as values issues. In the next few weeks, we are rallying in key states for Latino voters to raise these issues as priorities at the polls.”

For the first time, progressive religious organizations will be using state-of-the-art-technology to engage voters around social justice issues.

“Why faith matters in this election is that we can do all of the innovative, tech things, but in the end it’s all about people connecting with people and building relationships,” said Sister Simone Campbell of NETWORK: A National Catholic Social Justice Lobby. Sister Simone, the organizer of Nuns on the Bus, detailed plans of a new bus tour covering 10 states and 35 cities this fall aimed at combatting big money in politics.

As these campaigns grow in the coming weeks, Faith in Public Life will continue to share the work of these voices and organizations that are engaging and mobilizing people of faith across the country.

A full recording of today’s call can be heard here.

 

 

add a comment »

After Ferguson

August 29, 2014, 4:45 pm | Posted by

“True peace is not merely the absence of tension; it is the presence of justice.”
– Martin Luther King, Jr.

The tear gas has cleared from the streets of Ferguson, the National Guard has withdrawn, and Michael Brown has been laid to rest. But building true peace will take a long time.

Faith leaders began this process during the protests. Members of Clergy United, a 200-person St. Louis-area interfaith coalition, helped keep demonstrations nonviolent, counseled many outraged young residents, and provided a channel of communication between law enforcement and protesters.

Leaders from the PICO National Network, the Christian Community Development Association, Sojourners and numerous other groups went to Ferguson and helped the community channel heartbreak into constructive action. FPL organized an open letter from more than 300 faith leaders to the town’s police, mayor and citizens. The National African-American Clergy Network coalition released a powerful statement and set up a fund for Brown’s family.

It will take sustained effort and substantive change to achieve true peace. Independent, transparent investigations of both Brown’s killing and Ferguson law enforcement practices are necessary. Residents must become politically empowered to ensure real reform. Congregations must continue to organize disenfranchised residents and heal the wounds of racism. All of that will take a lot of work, but the leadership the faith community has already shown gives me hope.

add a comment »

Dayton Faith Leaders Respond to Rep. Turner, Call for Compassion for Refugee Children

July 28, 2014, 6:03 pm | Posted by

DAYTON, OH – Today, Dayton religious leaders responded to Rep. Mike Turner’s shameful criticism of plans to potentially shelter refugee children. As tens of thousands of children flee violence in their home countries, communities like Dayton – which pride themselves on being welcoming – must not turn away these children with callous indifference.

At his press conference this afternoon Rep. Turner claimed that Mayor Whaley does not speak for the community. These and many other Dayton faith leaders disagree:

Rev. Rodney Wallace Kennedy, Lead Pastor, First Baptist Church Dayton:

“Representative Mike Turner and six other elected officials, most from outside Dayton, have declared that Mayor Nan Whaley doesn’t speak for Dayton on the subject of caring for immigrant children. When Jesus said, ‘Let the little children come unto me,’ what did he mean? Care for the children and pass meaningful immigration reform.”

Sister Maria Stacy, SND, Director, Dayton Hispanic Catholic Ministries:

“This is an issue about defenseless children. The Holy Father, Pope Francis, calls us to welcome and protect these children. The violence in these countries calls for a humanitarian response to this crisis, not a closed door.”

Rev. Dr. Perry Henderson, Pastor, Corinthian Baptist Church:

“If sending desperate, vulnerable children back into the arms of murderous gangs and human traffickers isn’t a sin, I don’t know what is. Our faith tells us that we must not turn our back on these children of God.”

Rev. Sherry Gale, Senior Pastor, Grace United Methodist Church:

“We must be welcoming to all of God’s children and do everything in our power to combat this humanitarian crisis on the border. I am proud to stand with Mayor Whaley in supporting the principles laid out in the Welcome Dayton Plan to make Dayton an immigrant-friendly city.”

add a comment »

Archbishop Fiorenza: “Bishops have a lot to learn from Pope Francis.”

June 17, 2014, 10:55 am | Posted by

Joseph Fiorenza, Archbishop Emeritus of the 1.3 million-member Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, is a former president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (1998-2001). A leading social justice voice in the Church, Fiorenza spoke with Catholic Program Director John Gehring about the ways Pope Francis is setting a new tone and shaking up the Catholic conversation.

 

 In your opinion, what has been the most important change Pope Francis has brought to the Church and why are most people responding to him so positively?

The Pope seems to want a Church that is inclusive and out in the world, a Church going to the peripheries, a Church that is involved in the truly human problems that are affecting so many, especially the problems of poverty. He is also demonstrating a desire to enter into dialogue with an open spirit, not only among Catholics, but all people of goodwill who want the world to be more fair and just and peaceful. And even with those who may be our opponents he wants to find points where we can agree. Even when we don’t agree we should show respect and dignity. Bishops have a lot to learn from him, especially his lifestyle. He has made a deliberate effort to distance himself from the imperial court of Rome. Bishops have to take a close look at ourselves to see how we can live more simply.

 

Pope Francis has faced criticism from some Catholic conservatives. The editor of First Things wrote that the Pope’s “naïve” and “undisciplined” rhetoric has been “used to beat up on faithful Catholics.” Bishop Tobin of Providence, RI expressed reservations that the Pope was not talking more about abortion. Archbishop Chaput of Philadelphia acknowledged in an interview with the National Catholic Reporter that “the right wing of the church”…“generally have not been really happy about his (Francis’) election.” Why do you think he has faced this resistance?

The Pope’s very clear teaching condemning the “economy of exclusion” and the structures of sin that are involved strikes at the heart of some conservative Catholics who are so wedded to the unfettered free market that they think the Pope’s talk is naïve. Well, the Pope sees it as realistic. The poor of the world who suffer from that type of economic philosophy see it as realistic. The Pope is on a steady course. He is not naïve. He knows what he is doing.

Pope Francis makes it clear that he is opposed to abortion, but that can’t be the only thing we talk about. What he said early on in his papacy struck the heart of people who make abortion the whole agenda. The Pope is saying we have to oppose abortion but there must be a broader agenda. Some pro-life advocates don’t like to hear that and think if you take the focus off  abortion you weaken your position. The Pope is saying you weaken your pro-life position when you don’t take a broader view of issues that attack human life. Some people think there are only sins that are intrinsic evil, but the Pope is saying the economy has built in a structure that strongly impacts against the humanity of people and that is an evil too. Some pro-lifers don’t want to hear intrinsic evil entering into the conversation when it comes to the economy. By broadening the focus, he is strengthening our preaching against abortion.

 

As someone who is a leading voice in the Church on economic justice issues, do you think we will see a more robust emphasis on economic justice from the U.S. hierarchy because of Pope Francis?

If you take the “Gospel of Joy” (the Pope’s Apostolic Exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium) as guidance, I can’t help but think that will cause the bishops of this country to be more sensitive to the problems of the poor than they have been. That will take a while because there is an element in the church… some of the bishops of my time see these things more clearly than some of the new bishops who have come along in recent decades. But I’m hopeful that with Pope Francis they will broaden their views about the many ways human life are under attack.

 

Bishop McElroy of San Francisco has written in America magazine that the “substance and methodology of Pope Francis’ teachings on the rights of the poor have enormous implications for the culture and politics of the United States and for the church in this country…These teachings demand a transformation of the existing Catholic political conversation in our nation.”  Do you agree? Talk about what this “transformation” might look like? 

I agree completely with him. He is a young bishop but a bright light in the conference, and we would do well to listen more carefully to what he is saying. There has been discussion about some limited revision of Faithful Citizenship. (the U.S. bishops’ political responsibility statement.) The last time it didn’t include enough about what Pope Benedict said about economic justice in Caritas in Veritate. Hopefully, we will begin to see in Faithful Citizenship more emphasis on what Francis is saying about the poor. That will be a sign of how well Francis’ influence is taking root among the bishops of the United States.

  

Over the past several decades, the late Cardinal Bernardin’s vision of a Church that is known for “a consistent ethic of life” seems to have diminished some as U.S. church leaders put greater emphasis on fighting issues like civil same-sex marriage. Research from scholars like Robert Putnam of Harvard University and others shows that young Christians have left organized religion in part because of the perception that Church leaders are too cozy with a narrow conservative political agenda. Do you see this as a challenge for U.S. Catholic bishops?

I think there is truth in that perspective. A lot of young people are far more attracted when they see the Church opposing the death penalty, for example, where we have seen great progress and much more so than in my generation. I also think when young people see we are in the streets working with the poor I think that will make a difference.

 

How is Pope Francis different from Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI and the late Pope John Paul II?

I think he has a broader view. He comes from Latin America and has seen first hand the effects of globalization on his own people.

 

There is a lot of anticipation for the October Synod at the Vatican. Do you think there will be changes regarding the availability of Sacraments for divorced and remarried Catholics?

We should be guided by the spirit of the Gospel in a way that upholds the dignity or marriage. Hopefully, there will be a consideration of ways to have a path that includes these people (divorced and remarried) in the life of the Church but in a way that is not in conflict with the Church’s teachings on marriage.

 

Pope Francis has fully embraced the teachings of the Second Vatican Council for the laity to take an active role in Church life. What role do you see the laity playing in implementing the Francis agenda?

I hope they will be up front and strong about implementing that agenda in their parishes and dioceses. The “Gospel of Joy” can be their diocesan plan. If that becomes the starting point I think lay people will make a very positive contribution.

 

Some Catholics have expressed disappointment that Pope Francis has allowed the oversight of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious to continue. Are you hopeful for a positive resolution in that tense situation between Rome and women religious?

I think if Pope Francis had stopped the process it would have been perceived as him disagreeing with Benedict so I’m not really surprised the oversight (of LCWR) continued. But my hope is there is much more dialogue going on, and I hope they have a chance to meet with Pope Francis. Hopefully, there will be more voices coming forward among bishops who want to get this issue resolved. The Church has grown and been strengthened in this country because of women religious. They have been doing what Pope Francis has been talking about in the streets of the world, in the prisons.  They have done that far more effectively than anyone else in the church.

  

As someone who has been a Church leader for many years you can take the long view. Are you hopeful about the future of the Church?

I am hopeful as long as we continue to support what Pope Francis is doing and what he is trying to achieve. We have to take what he is saying seriously. We need bishops who reflect his style, and lay people have to be involved so that this Francis era is not just a passing moment but salt and light for our church for many years to come.

 

 

add a comment »