FPL Poll Spot

Home > Polls > The Gallup Coexist Index 2009: A Global Study of Interfaith Relations

The Gallup Coexist Index 2009: A Global Study of Interfaith Relations

Sponsor: Gallup, The Coexist Foundation
Released: 2009-05

View full poll

A groundbreaking new report by Gallup and the Coexist Foundation, The Gallup Coexist Index 2009: A Global Study of Interfaith Relations, is the first annual report on the state of faith relations in countries around the world. It shows that European Muslims are striving to be more involved, with 96% of German Muslims saying that mastering the national language is necessary for integration, 87% of French Muslims saying finding a job is important, and 84% of British Muslims expressing the need to celebrate national holidays.

Global research of religious tolerance conducted by Gallup demonstrates a clear gulf among countries surveyed on their views of religion’s importance in their everyday lives; 13 of the top 27 countries polled are in Asia and Africa; the bottom six countries are all in Europe.

Of the European populations surveyed, the Dutch and French are most open to having a neighbor of different faith, the Dutch and Norwegians are among the most likely to agree they always treat people of other faiths with respect. In Africa, Senegal, Sierra Leone and South Africa had the highest proportion of integrated respondents. Among Asian populations surveyed, Malaysians are most likely to agree most religions make a positive contribution to society, while Indians are the most likely to agree that they always treat people of other faiths with respect and that people of other religions always treat them with respect.

Other key findings include that people in Sierra Leone are among the most likely to say they have learnt something from someone of a different faith within the last year. Sierra Leoneans are among the most likely to agree that most religious faiths make a positive contribution to society. The public in the United States is among the least likely to object to a person of a different faith moving in next door. People in Burkina Faso, France, the US and Sierra Leone are among most likely to say they treat people of other religious faiths with respect.