Poll Spot

Arab-Americans: How we see ourselves

Sponsor: Arab American Institute
Released: 2007-07

Experiences of discrimination are not uniform within the Arab American community, with 76% of young Arab Americans (18 to 29 years old) and 58% of Arab American Muslims reporting that they have “personally experienced discrimination in the past because of [their] ethnicity,” as opposed to 42% of respondents overall. Arab Americans overall were split on […]

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Campaign 2008

Sponsor: CBS News
Released: 2007-06

65% of polled Republicans and 41% of polled Democrats think it’s appropriate for presidential candidates to talk publicly about their religious views. A majority of both Democrats and Republicans said religious leaders should not urge voters to vote for or against a candidate. This poll also includes questions about importance of shared and/or strong religious […]

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Muslim Americans: Middle Class and Mostly Mainstream

Sponsor: The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life
Released: 2007-05

Most Muslims classify their views as “moderate.” Most Muslims also overwhelmingly prefer the Democratic party. Their views can be classified as more liberal on economic issues/more conservative on social issues. This study also examines Muslim attitudes on foreign policy.

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Seeing Eye to Eye: A Survey of Jewish American and Arab American Public Opinion

Sponsor: Americans for Peace Now/Arab American Institute
Released: 2007-05

73% of Jewish Americans believe the U.S. should diplomatically engage with Iran. 80% of Jewish Americans believe President George W. Bush’s handling of Arab-Israeli conflict is ineffective; 76% believe President Bill Clinton’s Middle East policies were effective. This study also discusses general views toward 2008 Presidential candidates with respect to Israeli-Arab issues.

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Survey on Faith and the Presidential Election

Sponsor: Time/Pulsar Research
Released: 2007-05

By a two-to-one margin (62% to 29%), Republicans say a president should use his faith to guide his presidential decisions. By contrast, Democrats reject this idea by a similar two-to-one margin (58% to 32%). While the overwhelming majority of Republican voters (71%) agree that religious values should serve as a guide to what political leaders […]

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