The Moral March: Forward Together, Not One Step Back

February 10, 2014, 1:06 pm | Posted by

While I marched alongside 80,000 people at Saturday’s Moral March in Raleigh, North Carolina, I couldn’t help but feel I was witnessing a struggle for justice that will go down in history. The flurry of destructive, regressive state laws passed over the last year demanded an overwhelming moral response, and that’s what’s happening.

I watched Rev. William Barber II’s rousing keynote address from the roof of a six-story parking garage roughly 150 yards from the main stage. As if written in the script, halfway through his speech the sun came out and shined over the impassioned crowd that stretched more than four city blocks.

Rather than try to recapture now what it felt like, here’s what caught my eye, rang in my ears and stirred in my heart as the march unfolded:

 

 

 

 

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Medicaid and Mortality

February 5, 2014, 1:08 pm | Posted by

Earlier this week, a new study reported that as many as 17,000 Americans will die as a result of states refusing to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. One of the authors of the report summed up the situation well: “Political decisions have consequences, some of them lethal.”

Since the Supreme Court ruled that states could opt-out of Medicaid expansion, 25 have chosen to do so. The results? As many as 5 million of the neediest Americans are missing out on vital health insurance for purely political reasons. Many of the states that would benefit most from expansion are the very states saying no.

Given the moral stakes, people of faith aren’t sitting silently while this tragedy unfolds. From Allentown, Pennsylvania to Mankato, Minnesota, they’re giving voice to a simple pro-life message: no American should die for lack of health care.

In Ohio, Faith in Public Life has worked closely with Nuns on the Bus Ohio and Ohio Prophetic Voices to pressure Gov. John Kasich to expand Medicaid against the wishes of his Tea Party state legislature, providing coverage to 275,000 Ohioans. Other Governors should heed Kasich’s thoughtful words: “Now, when you die and get to the meeting with St. Peter, he’s probably not going to ask you much about what you did about keeping government small. But he is going to ask you what you did for the poor. You better have a good answer.”

Just last week, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon met with more than 350 religious leaders at Missouri Faith Voices and invoked the words of the Prophet Isaiah as he recommitted himself to enacting Medicaid expansion. He’ll need their leadership as this life-saving policy faces heated opposition in the state legislature.”

In the darkest days of the health care reform debate in 2010, when it looked like the legislation was destined for defeat, faith groups refused to give up hope. Nearly four years later, that struggle continues as religious leaders fight for a healthcare system that puts people ahead of politics.

 

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Family wage hits center stage

January 29, 2014, 2:50 pm | Posted by

Last fall I had the honor of praying in front of the White House with federal contract workers affiliated with Good Jobs Nation who were striking for a living wage. After a strong campaign of similar demonstrations, President Obama confirmed last night that he got the message.

In his State of the Union address, the president said he would require that all government contract workers be paid at least $10.10, and he reiterated the need for all American workers to paid at least that much.

The economic case for raising the minimum wage is strong, and the moral case is even stronger. Scripture is replete with condemnations of oppressing workers, and make no mistake, paying someone who works full time a wage that can’t cover a family’s basic necessities is oppressive.

The core values question here is whether we accept the notion that some workers must be destined for poverty in order for our economy to function well. The clear answer is no. As Pope Francis said, “Money must serve, not rule!”

Increasing the minimum wage faces fierce opposition among Tea Party extremists in Congress — even though the vast majority of Americans favor raising it.

So it’s inspiring to see faith leaders from in states across the country calling for a minimum wage that’s a family wage. Faith in Public Life is humbled to be working side by side with clergy leaders and groups like Interfaith Worker Justice and PICO National Network to help raise a clear moral voice for just wages that strengthen family bonds.

In 1968, the federal minimum wage was worth the equivalent of more than $10 today. Getting it back to that level isn’t asking for a miracle, and it’s a crucial step toward building an economy that is truly pro-family.

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Guest Post: January is National Human Trafficking Awareness Month

January 23, 2014, 4:21 pm | Posted by

 

Our friends at the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas are highlighting the moral issue of human trafficking this month. 

January is National Human Trafficking Awareness Month. Human Trafficking is defined as “modern day slavery” because it controls a person through force, fraud or coercion—physical or psychological—to exploit the person for forced labor, sexual exploitation, or both. Women, children and men are all affected by this crime. By federal law any minor exploited by prostitution or pornography is considered trafficked. Human Trafficking is the fastest growing criminal industry and profits are estimated at more than $32 billion annually. It is illegal in every country in the world. The demand must be stopped!

It is estimated that annually 27 million persons are trafficked globally: 80% are women; 15% are children; and 5% are men. In the U.S. 82% of the incidents involved sex trafficking, of these 98% are women & girls. Ninety-five percent of the victims experienced physical or sexual violence during trafficking and the majority of trafficking victims are between 18 and 24 years of age. In the U.S. alone, 100,000 U.S. children are commercially sexually exploited every year and the number may be as high as 300,000. The Internet is a major source for predators’ hunting, recruitment and trapping unsuspecting and/or innocent victims.

Where are the victims of Human Trafficking? They can be found in sweatshops, forced prostitution, domestic servitude, restaurants, agriculture, construction, and in hotel/motel cleaning services to name a few. During major sporting events such as the Super Bowl or World Cup, ads for and engagement of prostituted escorts significantly increase.

Who might be a victim?
• Someone employed in a hotel or restaurant you patronize
• A neighbor’s housekeeper or nanny
• A teenage girl “working the street”
• Residents of an apartment who are all young men working odd hours and never going out otherwise or young women who come and go in shifts during the night

What should one do if you suspect a person may be a victim of trafficking? Act on your suspicions and/or intuitions that something just “isn’t right” in a particular situation – call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center’s 24/7 Hotline at 1-888-3737-888 (they can also provide information on resources in your local area), your local law enforcement or the U.S. Department of Justice Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-428-7581. Reporting your concerns could save a life!

You can also join with other individuals and organizations addressing this issue as the Sisters of Mercy have. Together, they are working to raise awareness of the issue, providing direct services to victims and advocating for policy change and stronger legislation to abolish this criminal industry.

To learn more about human trafficking and how you can become involved, contact Sister Jeanne Christensen, RSM, Justice Advocate for Human Trafficking at jchristensen@mercywmw.org.

 

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Building a movement

January 15, 2014, 2:09 pm | Posted by

One of the central struggles in American politics right now is between a pro-family justice movement rooted in faith and a right-wing campaign to punish the poor and consolidate as much power in as few hands as possible.

Last year, this conflict manifested most clearly in North Carolina, where the Moral Mondays Forward Together movement brought thousands of people of faith to the state capitol to resist a vast array of unpopular, immoral policies rammed through the Republican-controlled legislature. Week after week, clergy and lay leaders marched, spoke out and were arrested in acts of civil disobedience. Meanwhile, lawmakers’ approval ratings plummeted.

What happens in these state capitols matters for all of us. As Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., said, injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.

Atlanta isn’t just the capital of the South, it’s my hometown and the cradle of the civil rights movement. Seeing a diverse, clergy-led movement spring up there now is inspiring beyond words – not only because of its symbolic significance, but also because it portends a future when justice once again rolls down like a mighty stream.

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